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Reading speed and comprehension

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Metech
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Reading speed and comprehension

Postby Metech » Monday July 27th, 2009 10:40 am MDT

I don't know about anyone else on this forum but a few years ago I determined that I will not live long enough to read all the books that I find worthy of my time. With that in mind I am very very soon to be, if it hasn't already happened, a Team Law beneficiary :ro and I'm anticipating a much heavier studying and reading load.

Are there others out there who feel a bit overwhelmed at times? Has anyone found to be effective any of the various programs available that are meant to increase ones reading speed and comprehension? Part of me thinks how great that would be to plow through books etc, with enormous efficiency and comprehension. Then part of me thinks that maybe that would be a mistake when studying law. Maybe one really needs to slow down so they grasp fully every word.

So - to bottom line this - what is the best way to study law and history and be most effective? Thanks and so looking forward to this journey of understanding and the next chapter of my book of life.

Jerry
Let truth be your authority not authority be your truth!

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Infinitcell
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Re: Reading speed and comprehension

Postby Infinitcell » Monday July 27th, 2009 12:36 pm MDT

At one time I lent my consciousness and capacity to a social security administration created trust who was attending college. There was a speed reading course and it helped us greatly!

Basically, it taught us how to read in chunks of words rather than individual words. It takes practice getting used to. Once one can read a chunk of a sentence the same way one sees a word as a whole, then one can spend more time with the activity of considering what one has just read. Reading word by word is exceptionally slow. The mind can go quite fast.

We practiced our speed reading on some very dense material (philosophy, such as Kant, Descartes, Hume, Locke, etc). We couldn't read that as fast as, say an ordinary novel, but what we were able to do is read the words quickly enough so that a 100 word sentence would register in our brain without us forgetting each of the individual parts. The effect was that we could spend more time considering the relationships and meanings of the words in relation to each other, allowing us to build a concept of the idea being described.

Prior to the speed reading course, we would often get lost with material, not remembering what the previous sentences were stating.

In our studies of law, we have read only a sentence or portions of sentences with our needing to stop and consider, look up words and phrases to even proceed. Not very speedy... but at least we get the words into our mental registry quickly which does help with concentration on the topic.

I cannot recommend a specific speed reading course of study because the one I was enrolled in was done so by a third party and we do not remember who or what that course was titled or what program it modeled itself after. So, sorry!

What we can say? Speed reading is awesome!

InfiniTcell
"Love is the Universal Immunizer"

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Re: Reading speed and comprehension

Postby Admin » Friday July 31st, 2009 3:35 pm MDT

:h: Jerry:
We expect everyone feels overwhelmed from time to time. Certainly, we all also need to learn far more that we have. And, for those with a driving force compelling them to learn all they can, developing tools to enhance our ability to learn always proves effective.

You asked if anyone has had any experience with speed-reading; and, as it happens we have had just that kind of experience. While still in High School, I was introduced to Evelyn Wood’s Reading Dynamics course. It was both interesting and effective. It taught us to expand our view; first using books printed with only two or three words on each line centered on the page. Then it moved to more words until you were back to reading a line at a time instead of a word at a time. The collage then added her training program to their curriculum as an option to English 101. I found that interesting, because English 101 was the primary required grammar course. Testing proved when students developed the speed-reading skills they respectively developed the higher grammar skills than provided in English 101, rendering that course comparatively unnecessary.

Years later, I met Paul Scheele, co-founder of Learning Strategies, and their technology called PhotoReading. It was awesome. Though we all process everything we see all of the time, since we were around two years old, we have been teaching ourselves to limit what we see and retain. The technology used in PhotoReading is to expand our perspective until we realize, ‘When we first look at a page we see everything on that page and have it stored in memory.” If we are also aware that our memory capacity is infinite and the real question is recall, then we can literally go through a process of first looking at each page of a book to acquire and store the images, second allow the unconscious mind to sort the pages of the book for later review and finally recall what you need when you need it. This final step is developed by trusting your unconscious mind to provide the information from the pages as you need them. Like any skill, the process takes practice. Unlike any other reading strategy, this one requires a totally different kind of process that you will have ever learned in conventional school.

Can it be used for law and history studies? Absolutely; it is only limited by your perception—certainly not by your mind.

To take it a bit farther, given the nature of our beings and of our respective minds, if we were to know that memory is the physical effect of holonomic oscillations generated and stored at the chromosomal level as a quantum microwave, we would then understand that the chromosome actually serves, not only as the backbone of our genetic code but also, as a quantum microwave engine that bears the potential of generating, storing and receiving quantum microwaves (in the ‘60’s we simply called them “vibes”). In fact, everything on the planet gives off quantum microwave energy and the chromosome has the potential of reading that energy and distinguishing that energy from our own and affecting the quantum microwave energy field that is all around us.

OK; so I just stepped off into the great abyss of metaphysics and into what the modern world we can only call “Theory”; still, if that is all true, then the limit of our actual reading potential is capable of being honed to the capacity of understanding every thought or experience that anyone has ever had. Of course, if you were to develop that level of reading skill, people around you would call you “God”.

Our point of presenting that here is, if you were to actually take the Standard for Review we presented and follow it from its beginning, to our Creator (who created mankind in the express image and likeness of God) and you were then to acknowledge our Creator is all knowing, you might also begin to perceive how that ability is possible. I see it as evidence that our level of reading comprehension and ability has no less bounds and it starts with understanding a few simple facts about reading. Please follow:
  1. You have eyes to see.
  2. You can today read words printed on a page and comprehend their meaning.
  3. After you read such words you can recall them and their meaning.
  4. Your memory is photographic—in other words, if you look and anything, when you see it you automatically create a mental image of that thing in your memory.
  5. Your recall is both photographic and analytical—that is to say, you can recall such images from your memory even with vivid detail and you automatically derive meaning from what you see.
  6. Accordingly, when you look at a page out of a book you automatically store a memory of that image.
  7. Because you know how to read, and you mind has the image of the page you automatically know the content of the written words on that photographic image.
  8. Accordingly, the only thing left is to develop the skill of recall of the written word from the image.
  9. Like learning how to read the first time, it takes a bit of practice to learn to trust your unconscious mind to provide you with understanding from PhotoReading
We know you can do it and you were born with every ability inherent to our species—in fact, its inevitable if you just focus on developing the skills.

Accordingly, our answer to your question:
Whether you start with old-school technology of Evelyn Wood or jump right into PhotoReading, the skills you develop will help you in almost anything you do thereafter. We highly recommended both systems.

We hope this information is helpful to you.
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