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Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

The mystery of Land Patents unveiled.

Moderators: Tnias, Jus

Soveriegnmoor
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Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Soveriegnmoor » Thursday February 19th, 2009 2:22 pm MST

Admin,
I Have acquired certified copies of the properties for land patents. In Maryland, I was told by some county workers in the clerks office; that they have never heard of the STRf. Below is what they know as a legal description:

"Lot Numbered Two (2) in Block Lettered "A" in the subdivision known as "Willow Wood Estates", as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book WWW63 at Plat 91 among the land records of Prince George's County, Maryland. Being in the 13th Election District."

This is exactly how the document reads letter for letter.
I also just read that Maryland deals in "meets & bounds".
Question: how does such a thing get into STRf? Or does it have to be in exactly that format in order for it to be effective?

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SimplyThinkDreams
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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby SimplyThinkDreams » Friday February 20th, 2009 2:02 pm MST

Soveriegnmoor,
If you are addressing the administrator personally it is better to send a private message.

If your land patent is described in meets and bounds then you do not have to convert to the STRf fromat. The situation was discussed in forum topic Land 101. Here is another link that describes what you must do in order to convert to STRf when necessary: Steps to secure a Land Patent.

Of course, that won’t help you if both your current legal description (Warranty Deed) and land patent description are in meets and bounds then you do not need to convert. The same would apply if both were in STRf. The only time you must convert is if the current format and land patent format are different.

SimplyThinkDreams

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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Admin » Monday February 23rd, 2009 4:54 pm MST

:h: Soveriegnmoor:
Actually, we imagine what SimplyThinkDreams intended to say was, take a look at the Steps to secure your Land Patent and you will notice that metes and bounds land descriptions work differently than STRf land descriptions.

Still, to secure your rights to the land patent secured rights you must prove the Land in question fits within the land described by the land patent that defines those rights. That is done either with a Certified Land Plat Map or with other similar official documents (similar in that they prove the land in question is within the patent secured land). The article SimplyThinkDreams referred you to explains that.

We hope this information is helpful to you.
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Jovanwalker
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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Jovanwalker » Saturday August 10th, 2013 10:01 am MDT

I am sharing the same concern as soverignmoor however from what I've gathered from this discussion both the land patent and the legal description need to use the same format, either strf or meets and bounds. I am also in Maryland and currently pursuing a land patent for my property and wanted to know if soverignmoor was able to get his land patent filed and where did he go to obtain the land patent. Maryland does not indicate an exact office like some of the other states. I wanted to know which bureau of Land Management do I go to exactly?

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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Admin » Sunday August 11th, 2013 8:33 am MDT

:h: Jovanwalker:
Those that responded to the initial post in this topical thread responded with instructions that hopefully directed Soverignmoor to the topic from which his question would be answered with a little bit of study. Respectively, those responses did not simply answer Soverignmoor’s question; rather, they directed him to the source from which he could learn his answer. That style of response is common from Team Law and those familiar with our work. Respectively, that style of answer is intended to help people learn how to learn instead of just spewing out answers and or advice.

Nonetheless, because it seems like you may have assumed a conclusion that was not intended from those responses, to help you resolve your inquiry we will: first correct that assumption, then correct a common misconception and finally provide a bit more depth to the original answer; as follows:
  • To correct the assumption that: “both the land patent and the legal description need to use the same format,” please review the articles found at
    1. Steps to secure your Land Patent; and,
    2. Land 101.
    From those articles you should easily see that though a land description can be in many different forms on varying related documents, the descriptions found on those documents should provide evidence of that necessary relationship.
  • Some people have a misconception (acquired from sources other than Team Law) that leads them to believe that they have to “file” the land patent related to their land in order to secure it;
    • However, that is not correct. Land patents are almost invariably already recorded in the official records of the state or country from whence the land patent was issued. Thus, that presence in the record is sufficient for that need.
  • The only places in the country where land descriptions are found in the “Section, Township and Range format” (STRf) are those places that were surveyed in the Rectangular Survey System inaugurated by the Continental Congress on May 20, 1785, for the survey of the public lands of the United States. Therefore, we would not expect clerks, etc. in the original 13 states (founded well before that date) to be aware of that style of land descriptions unless they had personal experience with working with land records from the rest of the country. Metes and Bounds land descriptions are both an ancient and a common way for providing land descriptions; respectively, such descriptions can even be found within areas where the STRf descriptions are used when the STRf description does not get specific enough to define a specific parcel of land.
    To provide his land description, Soverignmoor wrote:Lot Numbered Two (2) in Block Lettered "A" in the subdivision known as "Willow Wood Estates", as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book WWW63 at Plat 91 among the land records of Prince George's County, Maryland. Being in the 13th Election District."
    Thus, reviewing the land description, we find the reverence to an underlying instrument called a “Plat 91”, which is found in a particular Book (WWW63) located in the county records. Respectively, the land description describes the lot in question is defined as a part of the “Willow Wood Estates” on that Plat 91. Thus, if someone wanted to know what the source authority was for the Title (land patent) to that particular lot, they would go to that defined record (Plat 91) and read the legal description found on that Plat that described the land from which that subdivision was taken. There they would either find a metes and bounds description of the land in question or they would find a reference to some other platted subdivision land record. Of course, if the land in question was not in the original 13 states, they would most likely find the legal description on such a plat would be in STRf instead of metes and bounds.
We hope this information is helpful to you.
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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Jovanwalker » Saturday September 14th, 2013 10:45 am MDT

Hello Admin, thankyou very much for your response, however I am still having some issues securing the actual land patent. I went to my local land record department in my county and tried to trace the deeds back and ended up on a wild goose chase. I then went to the Maryland archive and was not able to obtain it there and was given the run around. I want to move forward to have team law produce my sandwich documents however its my understanding after reading the landpatent 101 that I must obtain this part first. Can you please point me in a clearer direction on where I need to obtain the original land patent in my state of Maryand. Thankyou very kindly.

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Re: Legal Descriptions: STRf vs "Meets and Bounds"

Postby Admin » Saturday September 14th, 2013 2:09 pm MDT

:h: Jovanwalker:
Though your last post is off topic from this topical thread, and borders on a request for Team Law beneficiary support, we will provide you with this insight. You are asking about a historical instrument; therefore, if we were interested in finding such a document we would turn to those that research, store and preserve historical records—like historical societies. There are many such sources in New England. If we were unsuccessful in that effort and had exhausted all other local, State and national sources, we would also look to the Great Britain’s land records.

We hope this information is helpful to you.
Tell everybody about Team Law! :t^:
Team Law,

"In memory of our God, our faith, and freedom,
and of our spouses, our children, and our peace.
"


As with all Forum posts, comments made by Admin are:
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